Danya Institute Inc.

Behavioral Health Videos: A Selective Overview for Educators and Practitioners

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

ADDICTION/DRUG USE

ADDICTION TREATMENT IN THE ELDERLY

ADDICTION TREATMENT IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

ADOLESCENTS AND DATING/RELATIONSHIP ABUSE

BIPOLAR DISORDER

BULLYING

CHILD ABUSE

CLINICAL SUPERVISION

DSM-5

GAMBLING

HEALTHCARE POLICY/REFORM

HEPATITIS

HIV/AIDS

HOMELESSNESS

HUMAN TRAFFICKING

MENTAL HEALTH

ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

TRAUMA/PTSD (POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER)

SELF-CARE

SOBRIETY/RECOVERY

STIGMA

SUICIDE

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

TUBERCULOSIS

CREDITS

 

INTRODUCTION

The inspiration for this overview of video resources came from two observations. The first was that training and education about behavioral health can be dramatically improved when integrated with video and other media. We know from learning theory that students must be engaged and motivated in order to learn. After all, the very first step in Robert Gagne’s 9 Events of Instruction is to “gain attention” in order to “ground the lesson and to motivate.” Many experts specifically recommend multimedia to accomplish this because it provides variety and visual stimulation. Perhaps most importantly, it provides context and story, and stories are a powerful way to hook learners.

We also know that there are measurable cognitive limits to how much information students can absorb in one sitting. Even the most knowledgeable subject matter experts can cause “death by PowerPoint” when they deliver presentations solely in lecture and slide format. Videos help break up a class and provide an exciting way to introduce new voices and perspectives. Videos can also give students a way to reflect and interact. The “YouTube” generation is comfortable with, and has even come to expect, multimedia education as a way to provoke more in-depth discussion that reinforces what is being taught.

The second inspiration was our awareness of the vast number of videos available today on behavioral health topics. While the quality and appropriateness can vary, we believe that many excellent documentaries and short videos are not reaching their full audiences. Therefore, we have used our expertise to curate some of the better examples and reviewed them so that you can easily judge whether they might enhance a presentation.

Most people who work in behavioral health in some capacity are familiar with the term “co-occurring.” This simply means that a mental disorder is often accompanied by a substance use disorder. In addition, various physical and emotional conditions are often present and must be addressed. Therefore, this guide covers a range of topics that are organized into more than twenty categories. Note that videos that address more than one issue are included in each of the appropriate categories in this guide.

Most of the videos listed are free and easily available online. This guide is not intended to be an exhaustive list since new videos are being released every day. We welcome your suggestions for videos that should be included in future editions of this guide. Email suggestions to sfary@danyainstiute.org or mail review copy to:

Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center

The Danya Institute, Inc.

8737 Colesville Road, Suite 300

Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-3921

Simone Fary, Instructional Design and Technology Specialist

October 2013

CREDITS

All short video reviews by Catie Greene, MS except for the sections on Hepatitis, Tuberculosis and Gambling by Jessica DiFrancesco

Introduction and reviews of longer videos (and ones for sale or rent) by Simone Fary

Edited by Lorri McDole, with additional editing by Kate Maclean